The Australian Journal
of Anthropology

Official Journal of
The Australian Anthropological Society

ISSN: 1035-8811

Volume 17, Number 1, April 2006

 

 


Land Succession and Fission in Nineteenth-century Western Victoria: The Case of Knenknenwurrung
Ian D. Clark

1-14

This article examines the evidence for land succession in western Victoria and considers the fission, fusion, and extinction of some clan groups at the time of contact with non-Aboriginal people in the late 1830s and 1840s. A special study is made of the intriguing scraps of evidence surrounding Knenknenwurrung. This appears to be the case of a cluster of related clans fragmenting and being absorbed into contiguous language groups¾some into Djadjawurrung, some Jardwadjali, and the majority absorbed into Djabwurrung. Exactly when this fragmentation and fission occurred is unclear, but certainly within the living memory of Aboriginal people in the early 1840s.

 

Technologies of Visibility: The Utopian Politics of Cameras, Televisions, Videos and Dreams in New Britain
Andrew Lattas

15-31

This paper explores how Melanesian villagers have harnessed modern, technological ways of seeing. It begins by analysing the politics and narrative structures of dreams and popular stories about secret photos concerning the dead. These are stories about losing control and regaining hidden, alternative representations of Melanesians. I then analyse how millenarian followers have experimented with ‘constructing’ their own versions of cameras, televisions and videos so as to gain access to the omniscient powers of modern technology and merge them with those of a Christian god and with the gaze of the dead. In the Pomio Kivung movement, ‘televisions’ and ‘videos’ have even been used to create new forms of moral surveillance for policing and governing communities. Here the customary shamanic worlds of dreams and possession have been modernised and redeployed to re-mediate the governmental practices and disciplinary schemes of civilisating projects originally belonging to Western churches and government.

 

 

The Nation-State, Public Education and the Logic of Migration: Chinese Students in Hungary
Pál Nyíri

32-46

This paper explores how Melanesian villagers have harnessed modern, technological ways of seeing. It begins by analysing the politics and narrative structures of dreams and popular stories about secret photos concerning the dead. These are stories about losing control and regaining hidden, alternative representations of Melanesians. I then analyse how millenarian followers have experimented with ‘constructing’ their own versions of cameras, televisions and videos so as to gain access to the omniscient powers of modern technology and merge them with those of a Christian god and with the gaze of the dead. In the Pomio Kivung movement, ‘televisions’ and ‘videos’ have even been used to create new forms of moral surveillance for policing and governing communities. Here the customary shamanic worlds of dreams and possession have been modernised and redeployed to re-mediate the governmental practices and disciplinary schemes of civilisating projects originally belonging to Western churches and government.

 

The Articulation of Indigenous and Exogenous Orders in Highland New Guinea and Beyond
Alan Rumsey

47-69

One of the leading challenges for contemporary anthropology is to try to contribute to an understanding of the interaction between indigenous and exogenous socio-cultural orders, especially at the frontiers of globalisation. Here I review three recent attempts to do so: (1) a model of structural transformation as developed by Marshall Sahlins; (2) a model of articulation as developed by James Clifford; (3) a model of ‘adoption’ proposed by Joel Robbins. As a test case for these models, I consider them in relation to some recent developments in local segmentary politics and verbal art in the Ku Waru region of Highland New Guinea. I show that all three models are in certain respects inadequate for understanding those developments, and offer some proposals as to what kinds of theory might be more adequate to the task.

 

SOAPBOX FORUM: The Schapelle Corby Show: Drugs, Media and Society
Laura Noszlopy (editor)

70-85

Introduction
Laura Noszlopy

70-71

The Trials of Schapelle Corby
Krishna Sen

72-75

Who is Corby? And Other Bewildering Questions
I Nyoman Darma Putra

76-78

Fear and Loathing in Our Own Holiday Paradise
Graeme MacRae

79-85

Book Review Article
‘Inscribing’Freud: A Critical Review. Celia Brickman, Aboriginal Populations in the Mind: Race and Primitivity in Psychoanalysis
Ute Eickelkamp

86-104

Book Review Essay
No Apology Necessary: Sahlin’s Dialectic History of the Fijian Wars. A Review of Marshall Sahlins, Apologies to Thucydides: Understanding History as Culture and Vice Versa
Kerry James

105-107

Book Review Essay
The Flexible Feminine in Vietnam: ‘Ordinary’ Goddesses and Extraordinary Ethnography. Review of Philip Taylor, Goddess on the Rise: Pilgrimage and Popular Religion in Vietnam
Rozanna Lilley

108-110

 

Book Reviews

 

Dorothy K. Billings, Cargo Cult as Theater: Political Performance in the Pacific [Andrew Lattas]

111-112

Vangelis Calotychos, Modern Greece: A Cultural Poetics [Tim Pilbrow]

113-114

Don Handelman, Nationalism and the Israeli State: Bureaucratic Logic in Public Events [Erez Cohen]

115-116

Luke Eric Lassiter, The Chicago Guide to Collaborative Ethnography [Ian S. McIntosh]

116-117

Gaynor Macdonald, Two Steps Forward Three Steps Back: A Wiradjuri Land Rights Journey [Raymond Madden]

117-118

Sanjay Srivastava, Sexual Sites, Seminal Attitude: Sexualities, Masculinities and Culture in South Asia [Rohan Bastin]

118-119

Lars Svendsen, A Philosophy of Boredom [Yasmine Musharbash]

119-121

Paul ten Have, Understanding Qualitative Research and Ethnomethodology [Simone Dennis]

121-122

Toon van Meijl and Jelle Miedema (eds), Shifting Images of Identity in the Pacific [Richard Chenhall]

122-123

James F. Weiner, Tree Leaf Talk: A Heideggerian Anthropology [Joel Robbins]

123-124

Unni Wikan, Generous Betrayal: Politics of Culture in the New Europe [Gillian Bottomley]

125-126


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