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The AAS Executive


AAS Executive Committee 2020

 

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President
President

A/Prof Lisa L. Wynn
Email: lisa.wynn@mq.edu.au

Lisa L. Wynn is an associate professor and Head of the Anthropology Department at Macquarie University in Sydney.  She is a medical anthropologist who writes about reproductive health technologies, gender ideologies, affect, and sexuality.  She also writes about research ethics and served on the NHMRC Working Committee to revise the sections of the Australian National Statement that pertain to qualitative research.  She is the author of the book Pyramids and Nightclubs (University of Texas Press, 2007) and Love, Sex, and Desire in Modern Egypt: Navigating the Margins of Respectability (Texas, 2018) and co-editor of, most recently, Abortion Pills, Test Tube Babies, and Sex Toys: Exploring Reproductive and Sexual Technologies in the Middle East and North Africa (Vanderbilt University Press, 2017).  She serves on the editorial board of the journal Maternal and Child Health.  Lisa received her PhD in cultural anthropology from Princeton University in 2003.  Subsequently she held postdoctoral research positions in Princeton's Office of Population Research and the Center for Health and Wellbeing.  In Australia, her research has been supported by grants and fellowships from the Australian Research Council and the Office of Learning and Teaching (National Teaching Fellowship), and her teaching has been recognised with a national Teaching Excellence Award from the Office of Learning and Teaching.


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President Emeritus/a
President Emeritus/a
A/Prof Jennifer Deger 
Email: jennifer.deger@jcu.edu.au

A/Prof Jennifer Deger is a Tropical Leader (Research) in the College of Art, Society and Education, James Cook University and the thematic leader of Creativity and Innovation at The Cairns Institute. She is also a founding member of Miyarrka Media, an arts collective based in the community of Gapuwiyak, NT. Dr Deger specialises in the study of visual culture and digital worlds. In collaboration with her Yolngu colleagues from Miyarrka Media, she has co-directed several award-winning films and co-created artworks and exhibitions held in Denmark, the US, Australia and Taiwan. These collaborative and practice-led research methods inform Dr Deger’s writing on aesthetics, film, art and photography, including her book Shimmering Screens: Making Media in an Aboriginal Community (2006). Since graduating from Macquarie University’s Department of Anthropology in 2004, Dr Deger has been awarded post-doctoral fellowships at Macquarie University and UNSW, has taken up Visiting Research Fellowships at NYU’s Center for Religion and Media (2011-2012), the Eye and Mind Research Group at Aarhus University (2016), and the Aarhus University Research Group on the Anthropocene (2017-2018) where she is collaborating on a digital humanities project on the more-than-human agents of ecological ruin. Dr Deger is currently completing a co-authored manuscript with Miyarrka Media on anthropology, mobile phones and social creativity that has been supported by an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship (2012-2016).

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President Elect
President Elect
Dr Debra McDougall
Email: debra.mcdougall@unimelb.edu.au

Debra McDougall is Senior Lecturer in Anthropology and Director of the Anthropology Major at the University of Melbourne. Debra studied History at Penn State University as an undergraduate and completed her MA and PhD at the University of Chicago. She is a scholar of Oceania with expertise in the anthropology of religion, language and culture, and gender relations; she has a growing interest in the anthropology of education and global socio-economic, political and epistemological inequality. Over two decades, her ethnographic and historical work has explored dynamics of community making in Australia’s near neighbour, Solomon Islands, with particular attention to how religious commitments shape ordinary people’s visions of what a polity should be. Debra is author of Engaging with Strangers: Love and Violence in the Rural Solomon Islands (2016), a historical ethnography that explored how people of Ranongga Island have managed relationships with strangers over more than a century, from the long distance warfare at the turn of the twentieth century to the struggles over resources and civil war that marked a transition to the twenty-first century. She has published numerous book chapters and articles exploring the dynamics of Christian conversion in Solomon Islands. Her current work is a collaborative project undertaken in partnership with Dr Alpheaus Zobule, founder and director of the Kulu Language Institute of Ranongga. This remarkable grassroots initiative from classes in basic literacy into a thriving campus where thousands of students study the grammar of their own small languages. With support from the Faculty of Arts at the University of Melbourne, the ARC Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language, and the Endangered Languages Documentation Program at SOAS University in London, they are working to bring the lessons of this local movement to a broader public in Solomon Islands.

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Secretary
Secretary
Dr Sophie Chao
Email: sophie.chao@sydney.edu.au

Dr Sophie Chao is a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the University of Sydney’s School of Philosophical and Historical Inquiry and the Charles Perkins Centre, and an Honorary Postdoctoral Fellow at Macquarie University. Her research explores the intersections of capitalism, ecology, health, and indigeneity in Indonesian West Papua. Sophie’s broader research interests include multispecies ethnography, phenomenology, the environmental humanities, Science and Technology Studies, food and diet, and the senses. Sophie holds a Bachelor of Arts (Honors) in Oriental Studies (Chinese and Tibetan) and a Master of Science in Social Anthropology from The University of Oxford. She completed a PhD in Anthropology at Macquarie University in 2019. Her thesis was awarded a Vice-Chancellor’s Commendation and the AAS PhD Thesis prize in 2019. Prior to her doctoral research, Sophie worked for indigenous rights organization Forest Peoples Programme and has published extensively on human rights and the palm oil sector in Southeast Asia. She has also undertaken consultancies for United Nations human rights bodies including the Food and Agriculture Organization and the Working Group on Business and Human Rights. For more information about Sophie's research, please visit www.morethanhumanworlds.com.

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Treasurer
Treasurer
Dr Geir Henning Presterudstuen
Email: G.Presterudstuen@westernsydney.edu.au

Dr Geir Henning Presterudstuen is a socio-cultural anthropologist and has conducted long-term fieldwork in Fiji since 2009. His PhD thesis, awarded in 2012, was entitled 'Masculinity, manhood and tradition' and reflects his main research interests which include the intersections between social categories such as gender, ethnicity, class and sexuality in context of the modern market economy. Other research interests includes economic anthropology, anthropology of religion and the supernatural and social theory. His key publications include a recent monograph Performing Masculinity: Body, Self and Identity in Modern Fiji (2019 Bloomsbury), two edited volumes: Monster Anthropology in Australasia and Beyond (2014 Palgrave Macmillan, with Yasmine Musharbash) and Anthropologies of Value: Cultures of accumulation across the Global North and South (2016 Pluto Press, with L.F. Angosto Ferrandez) as well as a number of articles in international journals. 

 

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Ordinary Director
Ordinary Director
Dr Marcus Barber
Email: marcus.barber@csiro.au

Marcus Barber is an anthropologist and Senior Research Scientist at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) based in Brisbane. He has been involved in research, teaching, and policy advising for almost twenty years, focused on Indigenous Australian rights to natural and cultural resources, and on the livelihood and development opportunities arising from those rights. Research partners in this work have included Indigenous Australian communities and land councils across four states, multiple Commonwealth, state, and local government departments and institutions, as well as diverse non-government organisations and corporations. Marcus is currently an Adjunct Senior Lecturer at the University of Queensland and previously taught for several years at James Cook University and at the Australian National University (ANU). He holds a BA and a BSc (Hons) from the University of Melbourne, and a PhD from ANU. He has previously served as Chair of the Accreditation Committee of the AAS. Alongside multiple articles and edited books about Indigenous Australians and environmental issues, he has recently begun generating multimedia research outputs, with one film completed and another in development.

 

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Ordinary Director
Ordinary Director
Dr Ute Eickelkamp
Email: ute.eickelkamp@icloud.com

I am an anthropologist and independent scholar interested in Indigenous Australian lives, urban nature and design anthropology. My ethnographic research has been with Anangu families in Central Australia, first in 1995 as a PhD student at Heidelberg University after I had completed undergraduate studies in Berlin (around the rather exciting time of the fall of the wall). Art, children’s imagination, ogres and the nexus of personhood, culture and ontology have been the various foci of my ethnographic analyses. In short, I am interested in the symbolic articulations of a transforming Indigenous cultural imaginary. Drawing on German humanities traditions, philosophy and psychoanalysis, I seek to understand how the Anangu I have come to know accommodate or not the existential pressures they chronically live with. Most recently, as an ARC Future Fellow, I have explored how Anangu thinkers, including vernacular Christians, speak about nature, history and being. We explored these themes during a journey to the Holy Land and in a collaborative workshop, Placing Spirit, Minding the World: Towards an Intercultural Ethic of Care, that brought together Anangu artists and educators, and non-Indigenous philosophers, poets and anthropologists. Presently, I am orienting towards interdisciplinary action research on rapidly changing ecologies beyond Australia – the post-coal world of Germany’s Ruhr Valley where I grew up. Publications include Don’t Ask for Stories: The Women of Ernabella and Their Art (1999); the co-edited Contexts of Child Development: Culture, Policy and Intervention (2008); and Growing Up in Central Australia: New Anthropological Studies of Aboriginal Childhood and Adolescence (2011).

Other Office Bearers

 

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Public Officer
Public Officer
Dr Grant McCall
Email: g.mccall@nissology.net

Grant McCall is a social anthropologist working in Eastern Polynesia on the topics of memory, land, and labour. He has taught at universities in Australia and overseas and done extensive archive as well as field research. Occasionally, he likes to dress up like an anthropologist, as shown in the attached photograph, taken at the Royal Anthropological Institute conference in 2012. Presently, he is very pleased to be part of the Department of Anthropology, The University of Sydney, whose regular seminars he has attended for years. Books, articles, and other activities can be found on his departmental webpage.

 

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Editor, The Australian Journal of Anthropology (TAJA)
Editor, The Australian Journal of Anthropology (TAJA)
Professor Andrew McWilliam
Email: A.McWilliam@westernsydney.edu.au

Andrew McWilliam is Professor of Anthropology in the School of Social Science and Psychology at Western Sydney University. He is a specialist in the anthropology of Southeast Asia with ethnographic interests in Eastern Indonesia and Timor-Leste as well as Northern Australia.  He was Associate Editor of The Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology (TAPJA 2013-2018).  Current research interests include post-conflict processes of social and economic recovery in Timor-Leste and a collaborative ARC project on household vulnerability and the politics of social protection in Indonesia. He has also worked extensively in applied anthropology and international development, including long and short term advisory work on technical assistance and resource governance projects in Indonesia, as well as Aboriginal land claims and native title research in Northern Australia.  Recent publications include co-edited volumes; The Routledge Handbook of Contemporary Timor-Leste (Routledge 2019), A New Era? Timor-Leste after the UN (ANU Press 2015) and Land and Life in Timor Leste: Ethnographic essays (ANU Press 2011); as well as a co-authored monograph, Property and Social Resilience in Times of Conflict: Land, Custom and Law in East Timor (Ashgate Press 2012). 

 

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Chairperson, Australian Network of Student Anthropologists (ANSA)
Chairperson, Australian Network of Student Anthropologists (ANSA)
Hanne Worsoe 
Email: ansa.exec@gmail.com

After graduating in Anthropology from the University of Sydney in the 1980s, and then working as a research assistant for then Professor Michael Allen, Hanne Worsoe went off to do everything else but practise formal Anthropology. Travel, meditation, volunteering, raising three children, co-running a business, primary and high school teaching, and then working in government for over a decade. She graduated from the University of Queensland in 2013 with a Masters of Development Practice, and a Graduate Certificate in Mediation and Conflict Resolution in 2014. She returned to Anthropology in the School of Social Science at UQ in 2016, after volunteering in the refugee field, to embark on her PhD about asylum-seekers in Australia facing new "fast track" refugee processing. Hanne is in the final year of writing up her thesis. She is supervised by Dr Jenny Munro and Professor Greg Marston.